Pin It

If you are wondering if you can use a Canon 5D Mark IV as a USB webcam, the answer is yes! You’ll just need a few pieces of hardware in order to get there. This post shows you how it all works, so read on!

First things first, you’ll need a way to use a HDMI signal as a USB webcam. The product that I use is the Magewell USB Capture HDMI Gen 2, shown below:

Magewell USB Capture HDMI Gen 2

Magewell USB Capture HDMI Gen 2

The product is literally as plug and play as anything I’ve ever worked with. The only limitation with this particular device is input/output resolution, which only goes as high as 1080p 60fps (more on that in a bit). It’s also somewhat expensive at $299, so for a less expensive alternative you can take a look at the MYPIN HDMI Game Capture Card, which does the same thing for about $200 less.

Next you’ll need an HDMI cable. The 5D Mark IV does not come with an HDMI cable, so you’ll need to buy one. This one will work fine

HDMI Cable

HDMI Cable

 

Setting up the Camera

The Canon 5D Mark IV doesn’t output at 60 frames per second, but it does output 59.94 fps, which is fine. Set the HDMI frame rate by hitting the “Menu” button on the back of the camera, then go to page 4 of the Setup menu (the little wrench icon).  The HDMI frame rate setting is the first one listed. 

Canon 5D Mark IV HDMI Output Settings

Canon 5D Mark IV HDMI Output Settings

Canon 5D Mark IV with 59.94 FPS selected

Canon 5D Mark IV with 59.94 FPS selected

Go ahead and plug your HDMI cable into the camera at this point, as shown below:

plugging the HDMI cable into the camera

plugging the HDMI cable into the camera

HDMI cable plugged into the camera

HDMI cable plugged into the camera

 

Attach the HDMI cable from the camera to the capture device

HDMI cable plugged into capture device

HDMI cable plugged into capture device

 

Plug the USB Cable from the Capture Device into the Computer

Doesn’t get much more simple than this. Just plug the USB cable from the capture device into your computer and the device automatically activates (the Magewell is pictured below). Windows 10 will recognize the device as “USB Capture HDMI” – essentially a HDMI to USB webcam.

USB cable plugged into computer from capture device.

USB cable plugged into computer from capture device.

 

Configuring Software

You’ll need to configure your software (such as the free OBS) to use your camera as a USB webcam. Settings will vary depending on the software you are using, but in general there should be a way to easily tell the software which device to use as a camera. Here’s how it works in OBS on Windows 10:

In the “Sources” window, click the plus icon to add a source and choose “Video Capture Device” as shown below:

Choose “Create new” and type in a name, as shown below:

If you don’t see a preview from your camera, double-click on the source you just created to open the settings and make sure that “USB Capture HDMI” is chosen, as shown below:

Once that’s configured, the software should give you a preview of what the camera sees.

 

Focus Mode on the Camera

The Canon 5D Mark IV has a “face tracking” focus mode that’s perfect for a webcam setting. In order to enable face tracking, go to page 4 of the “shoot” menu and use the center button on the back of the camera to select “AF method.” Select face tracking, as shown below:

AF Face Tracking Selected

Once selected, your menu should look like the image below:

Face Tracking AF Method enabled

 

Adjusting Further Camera Settings

You might see a bunch of menu items from the camera itself in the preview window of your software, and you’ll definitely want to get rid of those! You can easily remove them by pressing the “INFO” button on the back of the camera.

Info button on the back of the Canon 5D Mark IV

Info button on the back of the Canon 5D Mark IV

Keep pressing the Info button until you get a clean signal from the camera that’s not showing a bunch of menu items. The capture software you are using will record whatever it sees coming out of the HDMI port from the camera. It’s literally “what you see is what you get.”

If you don’t want those menu items to ever show up, there’s a setting on the camera that allows you to change that. On page 5 of the “shoot” menu on the 5D Mark IV (the menu with the little camera icon), there’s a setting for “HDMI display.” Press that and you’ll see that you can choose to have the camera output a signal without any info showing.

HDMI display setting

HDMI display setting

Output the HDMI signal without any info screens showing

Output the HDMI signal without any info screens showing

Another setting in that same menu allows you to have both the camera as well as the capture software show a preview, with HDMI output of the camera’s menu screen disabled if you hit the “Menu” button. This allows you to continue using the camera’s touchscreen LCD panel and adjust various camera settings while outputting a clean HDMI signal.

setting telling the camera to not display menus over HDMI

setting telling the camera to not display menus over HDMI

 

Disable Auto power off!

There’s one last setting you need to be aware of, and it’s a big one. Disable the “Auto power off” feature on the camera! Otherwise the camera will literally just shut itself off while you are recording or streaming. To disable the auto power off setting, hit the “Menu” button on the back of the camera, then go to page 2 of the Setup menu (the little wrench icon).  You’ll find the “Auto power off” as the first setting listed. Be sure to set it to “Disable.”

Auto Power Off settings

Auto Power Off settings

Disable the Auto power off settings!

Disable the Auto power off settings!

 

Audio Options

The 5D Mark IV as well as the Magewell USB Capture HDMI Gen 2 device can output sound over HDMI, which makes setting up the audio that much easier. It’s up to you whether or not you want to plug in an external mic or use the camera’s built-in microphone, but either way you should be able to configure your capture software to use the “HDMI (USB Capture HDMI)” as the audio source. Here’s how to set it up in OBS on Windows 10:

Go to the “File” menu and choose “Settings” as shown below:

Click on “Audio” and for the “Mic/Auxiliary Audio Device” select “HDMI (USB Capture HDMI)” as shown below:

Select "HDMI (USB Capture HDMI)" from this menu.

Select “HDMI (USB Capture HDMI)” from this menu.

You’ll see your audio levels active in the “Mic/Aux” section of the mixer in OBS as shown below:

OBS audio levels for the HDMI input

 

Battery Life

Suppose you want to use your camera for a live stream that will run for hours? Sadly, the standard battery won’t last very long without a bit of help. Fortunately, there is a solution.

The setup that I put together utilizes these four pieces of equipment (around $187 total):

Here’s how it works:

If you are using a tripod, the first thing to do is attach the Tether Tools StrapMoore to a leg on your tripod, as shown below:

Tethertools Strapmoore

Next, grab the power bank and the Case Relay Camera Power System. For my setup, I stacked the Power System on top of the power bank (in the middle), then holding both together, wrapped the TetherTool’s StrapMoore’s strap around them. The power bank and Power System are held in place both by the StrapMoore’s strap as well as the heavy-duty GripperElastic that the StrapMoore is lined with on the inside. The StrapMoore can hold up to two pounds without a problem.

Once attached, you’ll have both the power bank and the Case Relay Power System fitted snugly to your tripod leg via the StrapMoore. Go ahead and plug the USB cable from the Case Relay Camera Power System into any of the available USB ports on the power bank. Once that’s done, your setup should look similar to what’s shown below:

Strapmoore with Case Relay

The only thing left to do now is attach the Tether Tools Relay Camera Coupler and plug it into your camera where your original battery was. Keep in mind that in order for this to work on the Canon 5D Mark IV, you’ll need to use the little hidden “trap door” and run the cable from the Camera Coupler through it. The camera will literally not turn on unless the battery door is closed nice and tight, so this is a vital step! Shown below are some shots of how the hidden door works along with both ends of the Camera Coupler plugged in:

Hidden "trap door" on the body of the Canon 5D Mark IV

Hidden “trap door” on the body of the Canon 5D Mark IV

""</a

Camera Coupler fully seated in the camera's battery housing

Camera Coupler fully seated in the camera’s battery housing.

""</a

Camera Coupler Plugged in

The StrapMoore and the Case Relay Power System working together!

Once the Camera Coupler is attached, you can turn your camera on and enjoy hours of hot-swappable battery life!

If you need a continuous power source for a long video shoot, that can be done as well. I used a Samsung power adapter and plugged the USB cable from the Case Relay power system into it (shown below). If you don’t have a power adapter handy, this one will do the job.

Case Relay Power System plugged into a power adapter

Case Relay Power System plugged into a power adapter

I plugged the Samsung adapter into an extension cord and I was all set! Continuous power for as long as I needed it. 

That’s it! Let me know if you have any questions in the comments below!